News

Navigating the Virtual Holidays

Posted in Uncategorized on November 4th, 2020

The holidays will soon be upon us, and one thing is for certain, they won’t look or feel like previous years. According to the CDC, what most of us do over the holidays – gather together indoors – is exactly what we need to avoid this year because of the risks posed by the coronavirus. But many people are feeling down and could really benefit from spending time with loved ones. So, how can we approach the holidays in a way that keeps us safe and still fills our need for connection? Start with these tips:

  • Safety First! Gathering indoors in large groups is a bad choice this year. If you are contemplating a gathering with friends or family, you should carefully consider the location of the gathering, the duration, the number of people, the incidents of COVID in guests’ home communities, and the behaviors of guests prior to and during the gathering. How all those considerations are managed will make a difference in the safety of your event.
     
  • Recreate holiday traditions: Holiday traditions provide us with predictability, a sense of meaning, and a feeling of belonging. For these reasons, upholding traditions this holiday season may be more important than ever, even though we’ll have to modify their implementation. Plan ahead to figure out how to recreate in person traditions in a virtual environment. If you play flag football on Thanksgiving, get everyone connected for a game of “Madden for Xbox”. Cook and eat together via Zoom. Attend a virtual faith service together. Watch the same movie at the same time. With some creativity and planning, the possibilities are endless.
     
  • Communicate your plans: Letting family and friends know that you have decided not to gather together may be difficult. Others may not agree with your decision and be angry or resentful. So long as you make a decision that is right for your family, you can feel confident that you’re doing the right thing. You should acknowledge that others may be hurt or disappointed, but don’t feel compelled to manage their emotions or convince them that your decision is the right one.
     
  • Take time for gratitude and remembrance: This year might be the opportunity we all need to slow down and reflect on all that we cherish – including our close relationships. Take time this holiday season to watch old family movies, create a collage of past holidays, or write letters (good old fashioned letters) to loved ones that you cannot be with this year.
     
  • Plan for 2020 Holidays Part 2: The holidays are just dates on the calendar. What they represent and the meaning they hold can be celebrated any time of the year. Plan a modified holiday celebration on the actual 2020 holiday dates, then also schedule a full, old school holiday celebration sometime in the future, maybe late Spring when (hopefully) the risk won’t be as high and we can comfortably gather outdoors.
     
  • Keep up with your healthy habits: Hopefully, at some point during this pandemic, you have embraced healthy habits and self-care strategies. Are you going for a walk each day? Taking time for meditation? Exercising? Crafting? Whatever your healthy habits are, it’s important to maintain those behaviors during what is sure to be a stressful time.
     
  • Honor those who are no longer with you: If you have lost a loved one, recently or years ago, it may feel good to take time to honor their memory this holiday season. Place a special centerpiece at the holiday table, or perhaps light a candle. Place their picture in a prominent spot, or even write them a letter.
     
  • Acknowledge the emotions of sadness and disappointment: All of your efforts to make this year’s holidays special may still fall short. After all, nothing can replace being physically present with loved ones. These tips can take the sting out of virtual holidays, but you will likely still be left with feelings of sadness, disappointment, and longing. Rather than fight those feelings, acknowledge them. Make a place for them at the table, but let them know they will not be invited back next year.

If you or a family member are struggling with stress and anxiety of the upcoming holidays, give us a call to schedule an appointment with one of our clinicians, 978-327-6600.

Appointments are currently being provided via telehealth.

 

Festive Fall Fun

Posted in Uncategorized on November 4th, 2020
 
At Family Services, our programs are designed to enable children, families and individuals to develop lifelong skills, realize their potential, and along the way have some fun! While closely following all appropriate CDC and state safety guidelines, our programs organized some fun fall activities and exciting outings for our clients.
 
Here’s a sample of our Festive Fall Fun days!
 
  • Family Resource Center organized a day of Apple Picking for 11 clients.
 
  • Young Empowered Parents scheduled an outing to Smolak Farms for more than 10 clients and their families to pick out pumpkins and indulge in some fall treats!
 
  • Amigos hosted a virtual pumpkin decorating party for 26 mentees
 
 
It is because of your commitment and generosity that we are able to deliver creative and fun programming for our clients throughout the year. 
 
Thank you! 

COVID-19 Update: Sept. 15, 2020

Posted in Uncategorized on September 15th, 2020

As the world, our country, and our community continue to grapple with the ongoing COVID-19 crisis, we want to let you know how Family Services is responding and how the pandemic is changing our operations and programming. As always, in all decisions, the health and safety of Family Services’ staff and all the individuals and families we serve is our top priority.

Since March 13, 2020 Family Services’ staff have been working remotely and delivering as much programming and support as possible.  As summer turns to fall, we will remain largely remote, while slowly bringing back some in person services.

Although COVID-19 is primarily a physical health crisis, the toll it’s taking on mental health is enormous. Fear and isolation are the hallmarks of this pandemic. Family Services cannot treat a fever, but we can help people manage anxiety, cope with stress, and maintain self-care. To that end, Family Services has implemented many initiatives aimed at building the build the resilience of our clients, volunteers, staff and stakeholders in the face of this crisis:

  • Family Services’ leadership has been working closely with a large group of other nonprofit and municipal leaders to coordinate a community-wide response to COVID-19 and ensure that services for nutrition assistance, housing, health, education and emotional wellness are being ramped up and effectively coordinated. A comprehensive guide to resources in the Greater Lawrence community can be found here: wearelawrence.org/coronavirus
  • We are collaborating with the Merrimack Valley YMCA to coordinate the distribution of essential items for babies through their existing food pantry. More info here: mvymca.org/pantry
  • Crisis helplines have been provided by trained volunteers and staff to support individuals struggling with the emotional toll of the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Online trainings and workshops have been provided, including: back to school stress management, self-care, mental health 101, parent support, virtual child welfare screening, and relationship education.

Since Governor Charlie Baker began the phased “re-opening of the state in June, 2020, Family Services has modified its COVID-19 Safety Guidelines to allow some flexibility to serve individuals and families that have been unable to access quality services remotely. Currently, Family Services’ program supervisors may allow in person service provision, under strict guidelines for distancing and face mask usage, to meet the needs of children, adults and families in need.

Each of Family Services 20+ programs have implemented flexible and creative solutions to providing services. Below is a broad overview of each program area’s plans heading into the fall 2020:

  • Youth Development: Family Services’ youth development programs include community and academic based mentoring as well as group programming for health and wellness. The focus of our youth development efforts is on facilitating healthy relationships between youth and adults and peers. While we remain largely virtual in that effort, this fall may see some in-person activities. Youth mentoring services continue to recruit, train and match youth and adult mentors virtually, and are allowing some in person contact following strict guidelines. Academic mentoring will take place virtually to begin the year. Group programs that traditionally take place in a school setting will continue virtually, with occasional small groups meeting at Family Services as needed.
  • Parent Education: Most of Family Services’ work to support parents is happening on a one-to-one bases and happening virtually. Since the onset of the pandemic in March, the focus of parent education and support efforts have shifted from providing education and training on parenting skills, to focusing on helping parents navigate their child’s education employment and basic needs. However, virtual group programming has taken place and the organization is planning to hold small in person group programs onsite beginning in October, 2020. These groups will be kept below 10 persons and involve strict health and social distancing precautions. Child care and meals will not be provided at this time
  •  Mental Health: The most concerning secondary effect of the COVID-19 pandemic may prove to be a mental health crisis. The pandemic has caused many people to experience symptoms of anxiety and depression, and has erected obstacles to care for people who had previously been struggling. In March, 2020, Family Services’ mental health clinic began providing telehealth sessions for all clients. Beginning with the state’s phased re-opening, the organization is now seeing some clients in the office when telehealth sessions are not accessible or useful. Family Services also continues to operate it’s suicide crisis helpline, which has seen an increase in calls and requests for support.

We, along with the rest of the country, are adapting and changing our practices ever week as we learn more about effective precautions and as the risk levels fluctuate. What has remained constant is the need to ramp up new service models to help children and families navigate these extremely stressful circumstances. As the pandemic continues, we know there will be a long-lasting impact on our communities and there will surely be an increase in demands for services and programs. We stand ready to respond as needed.

Thank you for supporting Family Services as we work to support others. We wish you good health!

Warmly,

Elizabeth Sweeney

June 2, 2020 SPECIAL STATEMENT

Posted in Uncategorized on June 2nd, 2020
As an organization whose mission is rooted in compassion and respect for all people, Family Services is deeply troubled by the recent events in our nation. We work every day to help people overcome obstacles so that they can live happy, healthy lives. Racism and oppression are obstacles that we must address as individuals, as an organization, and as a nation – and they must be addressed now.
 
Human dignity and equality are values that should cause no controversy. They are values that should permeate every interaction that we have with family, friends, neighbors, and strangers. When those values are not upheld, we must take action. It is incumbent upon every person and every institution to determine how to be part of a solution. To that end, Family Services will redouble its efforts to lift up our community, to support individuals who face the obstacles of racism and oppression, and to advocate that all voices be heard. As an organization, we will continue the work begun years ago to constantly evaluate the ways in which our policies, procedures, and activities advance the values of dignity and equality, and make changes when we’re falling short.
 
These times are extremely stressful. The COVID-19 crisis combined with the eruption of civil unrest has everyone feeling unmoored. As always, during moments of struggle it is vital that we focus on the ways in which we, as people and as a community, can be a force for good. We are looking forward to seeing the progress that we will make as a nation and maintain hope for our future.

COVID-19 Response Update: May 1, 2020

Posted in Uncategorized on May 1st, 2020

As the world, our country, and our community grapples with the COVID-19 crisis, we want to let you know how Family Services is responding.  As you can imagine, the health and safety of Family Services’ staff, and all the individuals and families we serve remains our top priority.  Because we share in the collective duty to strengthen and care for our community, we want you to be informed about how this pandemic has affected our operations and our programs.

Since March 13, 2020 Family Services’ staff have been working remotely and delivering as much programming and support as possible.  Although COVID-19 is primarily a physical health crisis, the toll it’s taking on mental health is enormous.  Fear and isolation are the hallmarks of this pandemic.  Family Services cannot treat a fever, but we can help people manage anxiety, cope with stress, and maintain self-care.  To that end, we are taking the following steps to protect the health and build the resilience of our clients, volunteers, staff and stakeholders:

  • Family Services’ leadership is working closely with a large group of other nonprofit and municipal leaders to coordinate a community-wide response to COVID-19 and ensure that services for nutrition assistance, housing, health, education and emotional wellness are being ramped up and effectively coordinated.
  • Family Services has collected and disseminated donations of basic needs items to 100 families with young children. Going forward, Family Services is collaborating with the Merrimack Valley YMCA to coordinate the distribution of essential items for babies through their existing food pantry. 
  • Crisis helplines are being provided by trained volunteers and staff to support individuals struggling with the emotional toll of the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Online trainings and workshops are being provided, including:
  • Workshops on self-care being offered to front line workers at Greater Lawrence nonprofits.
  • Training on “mental health 101” being provided to front line workers in Greater Lawrence to help non-clinical professionals support the mental health of their constituents and colleagues.
  • Parenting support workshops being provided (in English and Spanish) to all community members to give parents ideas, advice and guidance on coping with difficult behaviors at home.
  • Relationship education and support being is provided (in English and Spanish) to help couples navigate the stress of financial, emotional and family stress.

In addition to these newly added services, Family Services’ existing programs are adapting and

  • Our Family & Community Resource Center, located at One Union Street in Lawrence, is reaching out to clients individually, assisting families to o those able to utilize technology. 
  • Our Mental Health Clinic, located at 430 N. Canal Street in Lawrence, continues to see nearly 200 clients each week. Most of this professional mental health treatment is being provided by telehealth.  However, because our clinic is categorized as an essential business, our office remains open (Tuesday – Thursday from 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.) in order to provide treatment to individuals who cannot access telehealth sessions.  
  • Youth mentoring programs continue to support (and create!) youth mentor matches and in doing so, have come up with a lot of very creative activities for matches to participate in together (including a Tik Tok dance competition, face mask contest, and online board games). Mentoring staff are also helping youth and families find and receive needed resources.  While contacting families, it became clear that parents were struggling to help their child(ren) with remote learning.  Mentoring staff have responded by creating an online tutoring program, which may be opened up to the community at large.
  • Court Appointed Special Advocates started the social distancing situation by training 15 new CASA volunteers via an 8 hour remote training session. Since then, the program has been assigned to nine new child abuse and neglect cases.  Volunteers continue to make contact with children on their cases and are monitoring the health and safety of children as best they can remotely.
  • The Samaritans of Merrimack Valley crisis helpline (being answered remotely by a trained cadre of volunteers) is experiencing an increase in calls, mostly resulting from people struggling with fears related to COVID-19. Individuals who participate in the Samaritans’ support groups (Safe Place group for loss survivors and attempt survivors groups) are being supported via online support groups.  Trainings to organizations that work with high risk individuals are also being moved to a remote platform.
  • Because our youth development services rely on in-person group activities taking place in school and community-based settings, recreating those programs remotely has been a slow and challenging process. However, Family Services youth development staff have maintained contact with youth individually and are currently planning group programming in collaboration with the Lawrence Public School system.
  • Parenting programs also rely on in person group activities, which have been put on hold. However, parenting program staff continue to reach out to clients and provide parenting support individually and offer online groups, and connecting families with important information and resources and assisting with critical needs.

Family Services entered this crisis in a strong financial position.  The organization has not yet had to cut back on staffing or service provision.  Many of the organization’s funders (private foundations and government grantors) have been very understanding and flexible in the use of funds, enabling us to shift operations and priorities.  Several of our fee for service programs (mental health clinic and court mandated parent education) are feeling the financial impact of not being fully open for business.  Most notably, Family Services fundraising activities have been dramatically impacted, as our annual gala and two additional fundraising events have been delayed.

In the short term, we feel confident in our ability to maintain all staff and all services.  Although the volume and effectiveness of many of our services are greatly diminished, especially those that rely on group activities, in the past week alone, our staff connected with over 1,000 clients!  As the future of the virus and the economy remains uncertain, we will continue to be creative, flexible and resourceful to do all we can to support individuals and families.

There will be a long-lasting impact on our communities and there will surely be an increase in demands for services and programs.  At Family Services, we stand ready to respond as needed.  To date, we have been inspired by the humanity and determination we’ve have seen from all corners of our local and larger communities.

Thank you for supporting Family Services as we work to support others.  We wish you good health!

COVID-19 Update, March 29, 2020

Posted in Uncategorized on March 29th, 2020

Family Services Coronavirus Response

***UPDATED March 29, 2020***

Dear Friends,

As news about the COVID-19 virus continues to evolve, the health and safety of our Family Services’ staff, and all the individuals and families our organization serves, is our top priority. Because we share in the collective duty to strengthen and care for our community, we want you to keep you informed of how this pandemic has affected our operations.

As of today (Sunday, March 29, 2020) we are aware of one Family Services staff member who has tested positive for COVID-19.  This individual was last at our One Union Street location on March 16, 2020 and had contact with only three other staff, who have been notified.  The staff member has not been to our central office (430 North Canal Street) for over a month, and is currently experiencing mild symptoms and recovering at home.

Family Services’ staff will continue to work remotely and deliver as much programming and support as we can to our community during these uncertain and unprecedented times.  We are adhering to recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as well as local and state public health authorities. Of course, as we closely monitor the ongoing situation, we will remain flexible and responsive to do the right thing for our community.

As a community partner for more than 160 years, we remain committed to continuing our mission to empower, nurture, and support children and families through life’s challenges to help them reach their full potential. Although this is primarily a physical health crisis, the toll it’s taking on mental health is enormous.  Fear and isolation are the hallmarks of this pandemic.  Family Services cannot treat a fever, but we can help people manage anxiety, cope with stress and maintain self-care.

To that end, I want you to be aware of what we’re doing to ensure the safety and care of all our clients, volunteers, staff and stakeholders:

  1. Our Family & Community Resource Center, located at One Union Street in Lawrence, will remain closed to the community until we receive confirmation from state and local officials that it is safe to re-open. For updated information on our schedule, please visit:  https://www.facebook.com/famcommresourcenter/
  2. Our Mental Health Clinic, located at 430 N. Canal Street in Lawrence, is categorized as an essential business and will be open to our current clients that are most in need of mental health services Tuesday – Thursday from 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Our professional clinicians will continue to conduct in-person session until tele-health sessions can be established for all clients.  If you are a current client and would like to speak with your clinician, please call: 978-327-6600.
  3. Family Services’ Samaritans helpline is fully staffed and operational.  These uncertain items can lead to feelings of isolation, sadness and depression.  If you or anyone you know needs to reach out for support during this difficult time, our Samaritans volunteers are here for you.
    • Toll Free: 1-866-912-4673
    • Merrimack Valley: 978-327-6607
    • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255
  1. Until further notice, all Family Services’ non-essential personnel are working remotely and we have asked both staff and volunteers to refrain from in-person meetings. That said, we are working to stay connected to young people via creative online mentoring sessions and opportunities, and developing ways to continue to build and strengthen our community.  We will re-evaluate these decisions as more information and direction becomes available from the CDC as well as state and local government agencies, and we will make decisions that continue to put the safety and well-being of our clients and staff first.
  2. Family Services accepting donations of basic needs items for families with young children. If you are able to make a donation of diapers (any size), pull ups, wipes, or formula (Similac Advance or Similar Soy Isomil), please email [email protected].

There will be a long-lasting impact on our communities and there will surely be an increase in demand for services and programs.  At Family Services, we stand ready to respond as needed. In doing so, we continue to require the help of the community more than ever. If you would like to support our evolving efforts, please visit fsmv.org/giving to help us to continue our important work!

Leading in times of uncertainty is always a challenge. And yet I have been inspired by the humanity and determination I have seen from all corners of our local and larger communities.

We stand ready to assist the community and encourage you to be courageous in doing what is right for your families, your organizations and our community. We are always better together!

Warmly,

Elizabeth Sweeney, Chief Executive Officer

Fathers and Family Network

Posted in Fatherhood on January 28th, 2019

Family Services is honored to operate the local Fathers & Family Network, which is part of a statewide networking and training group for professionals who work with fathers. This statewide network is generously funded and supported by The Children’s Trust.

The next Fathers & Family Network event is this Thursday, January 31, 2019 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. at Family Services’ central office located at 430 North Canal St. Lawrence. This month, we are pleased to welcome Michael Ramos, Fathers and Family Coordinator at The Children’s Trust. Mr. Ramos coordinates Fatherhood activities for The Children’s Trust, which, in addition to the Fathers & Family Network, also includes the Nurturing Fathers Program. Nurturing Fathers is a curriculum-based program that helps fathers build and strengthen positive parenting attitudes and behaviors.

Individuals interested in attending the January 31 meeting of the Fathers & Family Network are asked to RSVP to Betsy Green at [email protected]. Lunch will be provided.

Welcome to Family Services!

Posted in Community on December 19th, 2018

There’s quite a lot packed under the roof here at Family Services of the Merrimack Valley (FSMV).  From our Mentoring Programs, our Family Programs, a Mental Health Clinic, Essex County Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA), Samaritans of the Merrimack Valley, and on to our Administrative Offices… there’s a swell of traffic in and out of 430 North Canal Street on any given day.  Fielding that flow of clients and colleagues and assorted other visitors to Family Services is our fabulous reception team, headed up by Connie Rascon (pictured left).  A smile needs no translating, and that is evidenced daily when visitors enter our lobby and are welcomed with that universal language. 

Rascon has been receiving FSMV callers (by telephone and in person) for over three years.  Her role managing the reception area involves ongoing multi-tasking and being asked a million questions – often into the early evening hours.  Her strategy?  “It varies daily,” says she.  “But I try to let everyone know where I am in the process of finishing a task – just so they know I am working on it!  Even if it’s just to say, ‘I’m still looking into it.’ ”  As that first impression our visitors have of Family Services, she and her colleagues go out of their way to try and make them feel comfortable by welcoming them all by name.  “I notice a lot of people appreciate that gesture,” shares Connie.  Enjoying relaxing music and binge watching Friends on television fuels her in her off hours and helps her to show up with a smile – day in and day out.  We appreciate YOU Connie and our entire Family Services team for the difference you make!

Family Services of the Merrimack Valley, a non-profit social service agency engaged in game changing work which helps children and families live their BEST lives, was established in 1854 as the Lawrence City Mission.  During its first 70 years, the organization was primarily concerned with providing material assistance to newly arrived mill workers in the City of Lawrence.  With the advent of the New Deal and the implementation of federal programs in the 1930’s, the organization shifted its mission to align with the national trend in the field of social work which focused on self-improvement and counseling.  This shift inspired a name change to reflect its new focus, and the City Mission became Family Service Association of Greater Lawrence (FSAGL).  The 1980s brought another significant shift as the organization expanded to provide group programs focused on care and prevention.  Since 1985, the organization has grown from a staff of seven to a staff of 80+ providing over 20 treatment, prevention, and outreach and education programs. In 2013, Family Services adopted a new name, Family Services of the Merrimack Valley, which reflects the growth in the scope and reach of its services over its nearly 160-year history.  

Our purpose at Family Services is to drive outcomes, and we continue do so by nurturing inner strengths, teaching life skills, championing emotional wellness and providing vital community-based resources in the Merrimack Valley.  If you or someone you know would like to be a part of the work we do here, please check out our current employment opportunities on our Job Postings page.

 

 

Grandparents as Caregivers

Posted in Community on December 11th, 2018

Nationwide, 2.7 million grandparents are raising grandchildren, and according to census figures, about one-fifth of those have incomes that fall below the poverty line.  A recent PBS News Hour spotlight on this issue suggests that their ranks are increasing with the number of grandparents raising grandchildren in the United States up 7 percent from 2009.  Factors such as the opiate epidemic, military deployment and a growth in the number of women incarcerated continue to bolster this trend.

Many of these grandparents are living on fixed incomes and managing chronic illnesses or a disability.  “People who step forward, step forward because there is a crisis in their family and apparently don’t take into account their own limitations,” said Esme Fuller-Thomson, a professor of social work at the University of Toronto, who has researched grandparent caregiving in the United States.  Raising grandchildren takes a heavy toll on grandparents according to a 2018 article entitled This is the Age of Grandparents in The Atlantic.  Higher-than-normal rates of depression, sleeplessness, emotional problems, and chronic health problems like hypertension and diabetes; feelings of exhaustion, loneliness, and isolation; a sense of having too little privacy, and too little time to spend with their spouses, friends, and other family members.  All of these stressors heighten the pressure put upon those grandparents who assume the role of primary caregiver.

Here in the Merrimack Valley especially, there exists a disproportionately high rate of poverty among grandparents raising grandchildren, with more than 40 percent reporting unmet economic or social-service needs—for themselves or, more often, their grandchildren.  As more and more grandparents step into parental roles, support services become increasingly essential. That urgency is exhibited in the bi-weekly Grandparent Support Group hosted at Family Services of the Merrimack Valley’s Family & Community Resource Center (FRC) located at One Union Street in Lawrence.  The facilitated bi-lingual group discussions are free and open to to all area grandparents navigating the obstacles associated with raising (or helping to raise) grandchildren.  “Here, we welcome all age groups,” notes the group’s facilitator and FRC Family Partner Maggie DeLosSantos.  “We have about 10 parents/grandparents attending each session.  They really look forward to coming here.  These gatherings offer an opportunity to exchange ideas and ask questions – to share struggles and solutions.”  Just hearing from others balancing similar responsibilities, people who have been there, can uplift spirits.  

Although the burden can be overwhelming, helping to raise grandchildren also affords grandparents a golden opportunity to make a difference in the life of a child.  The FRC Grandparent Support Group offers that forum for recognizing and seizing such opportunities.  “The content here in our group is great.  But, what keeps me coming back is Maggie, our facilitator,” comments Isabel (pictured above at right), a longtime participant.  To that, Maggie replies, “I make certain that everyone in the group can stay connected outside of our meetings as things come up back in their homes.  It’s great to see how they really do stay in touch with one another.”  This week, the group will celebrate these bonds (along with their grandchildren) at the FRC’s annual holiday celebration.  “Good friendships have formed as a result of our time together here sharing our experiences,” shares Ms. DeLosSantos with a bright smile as she concludes another productive morning empowering parents to be their best selves as grandparents raising children.

Family Services of the Merrimack Valley partners with the Department of Children and Families to provide the Family & Community Resource Center, located at One Union Street in Lawrence to help families raise children in healthy, stable homes. All services are free and open to all families in Essex County.  To learn more about upcoming programming or other offerings at our Family & Community Resource Center, please visit their program page, or call 978-975-8800.

Services Include:

  • Assessment and family support planning.
  • Peer-to-peer support groups for youth, grandparents raising grandchildren, and “Parents Helping Parents”.
  • Life skills workshops for youth, parents and families, such as bullying prevention, financial literacy and behavior management.
  • Cultural, social, recreational, and community service activities, including holiday gatherings, bingo nights, and National Night Out.
  • Information and referral services.
  • English as a Second Language classes.

HelpGuide.org is a nonprofit site also offering grandparents resources, tools and ideas on how to get help and make the most of raising grandchildren.

 

 

Spa Treatment…

Posted in Community on December 6th, 2018

Fitness Saturdays Empower Parents to Be Well

It’s a Saturday morning, and a dozen women fill a conference style room which has, for a few hours, been transformed into a yoga studio.  Rainbow colored yoga mats cover the floor, chairs and tables have been moved off to the side and the atmosphere is… tranquil.  The instructor cues the students to focus on their breathing as she begins to lead them in practice of the ancient eight-limbed system of yoga – a practice much revered for its myriad healing properties.  From the determined looks on the participants’ faces and the energy building in the room, these women are all in.  That momentum is sustained as the instructor leads them deeper into a series of postures and then eventually into a few minutes of quiet Savasana (rest) on their mats as the class concludes.  The instructor is Certified Nutritionist Belkis Fermin, and yoga represents just one portion of the three-part Fitness Saturday wellness curriculum offered monthly at Family Services of the Merrimack Valley’s Family and Community Resource Center.  The physical wellness component is bolstered by a nutrition-centered lecture and cooking demonstration.  While their children are cared for on site, the freely offered programming allows area parents to pause and take some time out for themselves to focus on their own well being as well as that of their family.

Education, Exercise and Cooking…  Ms. Fermin takes care to distribute equal weight to each of these areas throughout her two hour workshops.  “I try to relate our curriculum to things that are of concern for the parents who participate.  I often begin my lesson plan by curating a recipe, and then making certain modifications (i.e., swapping out brown sugar for white, or using whole wheat flour where flour is called for).  Parents need to be aware of what they are feeding their kids.”  Last month’s Fitness Saturday focused on nutrition problems commonly experienced by adolescents, such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia.  Sharing content from Kids Health, Fermin centered her lesson on warning signs for parents and best practices for supporting children who present symptoms of these types of eating disorders.  Serious medical illnesses, eating disorders often go along with other problems such as stress, anxiety, depression, and substance use and can lead to the development of serious physical health problems, such as heart conditions or kidney failure.  Throughout the program’s educational session, the parents are invited to chime in with their own personal questions and concerns of which there is plenty.

The exercise, or movement, session provides participants with an opportunity to engage in some self-care which the instructor believes is the foundation of a family’s well being.  During this component accessible practices (such as yoga) are demonstrated and (gently) prescribed as a wise antidote to the stress that naturally presents when balancing the responsibilities of a job with caring for children and a home.  Next up is the cooking – where, once again, the approach is hands-on.  Cutting boards and knives are dispersed upon which green and red peppers are diced and cilantro and onions are chopped.  “The cooking component is our last portion of these wellness sessions,” shares Ms. Fermin.  “Participants really enjoy this 30 or so minutes.  It’s where the lesson comes alive!”  As her recipe unfolds, the conference room is once again transformed (this time into a kitchen), and the scent of garlic and tomato fills the air.  There is continued conversation and inquiry which the instructor fields in real time before the group sits down to enjoy their finished product and an exhale after a full morning devoted to being well.

Family Services of the Merrimack Valley partners with the Department of Children and Families to provide the Family & Community Resource Center, located at One Union Street in Lawrence to help families raise children in healthy, stable homes. All services are free and open to all families in Essex County.  To learn more about upcoming wellness or programming or other offering at our Family & Community Resource Center, please visit their program page, or call 978-975-8800.

Services Include:

  • Assessment and family support planning.
  • Peer-to-peer support groups for youth, grandparents raising grandchildren, and “Parents Helping Parents”.
  • Life skills workshops for youth, parents and families, such as bullying prevention, financial literacy and behavior management.
  • Cultural, social, recreational, and community service activities, including holiday gatherings, bingo nights, and National Night Out.
  • Information and referral services.
  • English as a Second Language classes.